Last Surviving Male White Rhino is Guarded 24/7

Is there any hope left for humanity?

Hailey Dickman, Editor and Staff Writer

Sudan, the world’s only male northern white rhino, is the last hope for his race. In October of 2014, Suni, the only other male white rhino, passed away. Now, there are only five northern white rhinos left in the world, four of which are females, and according to dailymail.co.uk, “the three in Kenya are in particular danger.”

In the wild, rhinos like Sudan do not have any predators because of their size. So the rangers protect Sudan from his only predators—humans. (Photo from dailymail.co.uk)
In the wild, rhinos like Sudan do not have any predators because of their size. So the rangers protect Sudan from his only predators—humans. (Photo from dailymail.co.uk)

At 43 years old, with a life expectancy of 50 or so years, Sudan is not able to live a “peaceful life” in the Kenyan reserve of Ol Pojeta. Because of money-hungry poachers, he has been put under 24/7 armed guard, and his horn has been removed in the hopes of keeping him safe. Yet the team of 40, who have been given world-class training and are armed with the last equipment, still fear for Sudan’s safety.

Poaching is a huge problem for endangered species like Sudan and the other northern white rhinos. Less than a year ago, there was the whole Kendall Jones scandal in which the nineteen-year-old Texas cheerleader had a controversial Facebook page celebrating her “trophies” (otherwise known as the animals that she killed), one of which was a white rhino.

Kendall Jones with her “prized,” and also endangered, white rhino carcass. Isn’t she a gem? (Photo from buzzfeed.com)
Kendall Jones with her “prized,” and also endangered, white rhino carcass. Isn’t she a gem? (Photo from buzzfeed.com)

Kendall Jones, however, is not the only person who has been ignorant and heartless about animals and their rights to live happy lives—otherwise there would not be team of 40 people risking their lives every day to keep one white rhino safe.

White Rhino 3
Photo from www.dailymail.co.uk

For six months, the team costs £75,000—which is about $115,300. The team is usually paid for by tourism in Kenya, but with the Ebola scare that broke out, not many people have been visiting Kenya. To help secure the Sudan and the rangers, you can visit Ol Pejeta’s GoFundMe page.

In my mind, though, money is not the only concern here, so I don’t mean for that to seem like the point of this article. It is completely sickening to me that one poor white rhino has to spend the last ten years of his life in harm’s way because of the ruthless people out there that do not believe animals have feelings like we do.

The guards who stay with Sudan are heroes. They aren’t in it for the money, but instead they are putting their own lives in danger to save someone else’s and reassuring the rest of us that there is still hope for humanity.